Battling the Water Shortage on Barbuda

Imagine having to plan your shower or the cooking of your meals around when you may have running water. How can an island in the midst of rebuilding itself manage a construction project or clean up after a painting initiative without enough water? How can its residents keep up with daily chores? How can the economy thrive? How can the people’s health remain safe?

As with many places in the world, the Caribbean countries can suffer from prolonged droughts that can put a strain on the water supplies in their nation. Barbuda is no stranger to these pressures. With the added destructive effects from Hurricane Irma, which occurred almost two years ago, Barbudans are still struggling with access to consistent running water throughout their day. Very often, in order to deal with the shortage, a water rationing system means that running water is only available every two hours.

There are several reasons for this. The water system on Barbuda only has enough storage from the desalination plant for approximately 8,000 gallons. The system itself is also plagued with leaks that require repairs and replacement from the utility company.

In addition, the water quality is also very poor.

” Very often, in order to deal with the shortage, a water rationing system means that running water is only available every two hours.”

Craig Henderson, Coco Point Fund Board Member

Coco Point Fund, in conjunction with the Jumby Bay Fund, the Mill Reef Fund and the Discovery Land Company are working together towards a solution. The group is very close to putting a complete plan in place to build a concrete base, install a new tank, and repair or replace all the broken parts that support the system. The Antigua Public Utilities Authority (APUA) is reviewing the proposal now and approval is imminent.

If you’d like to donate money to our organization to work alongside APUA to address the issue of the water shortage please visit our Donate Page today.

Photo Credit: Mohammid Walbrook

Feature Photo Credit: Water.org

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